Breaking down Health Reform

For you and your employees

  • Access our Intuit Health Benefits Marketplace
  • Download FREE Affordable Care Act guide
  • Analyze options with FREE subsidy calculator

 

We'll keep you up-to-date.

When does Health Reform kick in?

 

Health Care Reform Timeline

 

How big is your business? And why it matters.

If you're a sole proprietor and work for yourself, you are required to obtain your own health insurance. 

With fewer than 99 full-time equivalent employees, there's no requirement. But you can still help your employees afford health insurance.

If you have 100+ full-time equivalent employees, starting January 1st, 2015 it will be mandatory to offer health insurance to your employees.  


 

Your health reform options

Three ways to help employees get affordable insurance 

Help your employees afford their own insurance

Contribute as much (or little) as you want towards employees' own plans. Exclusive to Intuit Online Payroll

 

Offer group insurance to your employees

Compare cost & find applications at the Small Business Health Options Program.

 

Let your employees find their own health plan.

With fewer than 50 employees, you can do nothing. Let your employees enroll online.

 

Intuit Health Benefits Marketplace

No matter how much (or little) you contribute to your employees' plans, you'll be a hero. Every bit helps. Plus, employees can choose the right plan for them from well-selected options in the Intuit Health Benefits Marketplace.

 

Available in all 50 states. Learn more about the Intuit Health Benefits Marketplace Today

From the To Do list in Intuit Online Payroll, click on "Help your employees buy affordable health insurance" to invite them to find the plan that works best for them.

Helpful Health Reform Resources

 

 

FREE ACA Guide for Small Businesses

This clearly written guide spells it all out. Download it now to learn how the Affordable Care Act affects you and your employees.

 

 

FREE Subsidy Calculator

This convenient online tool helps you
and your employees determine who
qualifies for government subsidies
based on income.

 

Employee Notification Template

The ACA requires you to notify employees of their options by October 31, 2013. Though there's no late penalty, download these helpful templates if needed.

 

If you provide Group insurance,

Click here

If you don't provide Group insurance,

Click here

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to provide health insurance?

 

That depends on the number of employees you have. If you are a small business with fewer than 99 full-time equivalent employees, you are not required to provide health care insurance under the Act, but there are tax incentives available if you do. You can calculate your potential tax credit at The Small Business Majority Site.

 

Due to a recent delay of the employer mandate, employers with 50-99 employees now have until 2016 (rather than 2015) to offer health insurance benefits to their employees, or risk paying a penalty of $2000 per employee, starting with the 31st employee.


Employers with 100 or more FTEs will also have the benefit of the gradual phase-in rule. Under the gradual phase-in rule, in 2015, large employers with 100 or more FTE employees only need to offer 70% of their FTE employees insurance coverage. Provide they meet this requirement, the employer will be exempt from the "sledgehammer" tax provisions under the ACA. These same employers, however, will need to offer 95% of their FTE employees insurance coverage by 2016. 

How does the government define a "full-time" employee? How do I calculate the number of 'full-time equivalent employees' that I have?

 

A full-time employee is someone who works more than 30 hours per week on average. An easy way to determine whether you have 50 or more full-time equivalent employees is to take the total number of hours worked in a given month by your employees and divide that number by 173.33. This will give you the total number of full-time equivalent employees. You can use this calculator provided by the US Chamber of Commerce to determine whether you have 50 or more full-time equivalent employees.

Do my employees need to have health insurance?

 

Yes. There will be a few exemptions granted to those who:

  • Earn less than the income amount required to file taxes ($9,350 for an individual)
  • Belong to a religious group that opposes acceptance of benefits provided by a health insurance policy
  • Belong to a health sharing ministry, or American Indian tribe
  • Are undocumented
  • Are incarcerated
  • Could not find "affordable" coverage that cost less than 9.5% of their income

What happens if my employees do not have insurance?

 

They will be subject to penalties. The 2014 penalties for not having health insurance are as follows: $95 per adult and $47.50 per child (up to $285 per family), or 1% of the annual family income, whichever is greater. The penalty is expected to go up every year until 2016.

Will there be financial help available to employees who can't afford insurance?

 

Yes, government subsidies will be available for low and moderate income families. Use our calculator to see if your employees qualify for a health care tax credit.

Am I required to share any information about the Affordable Care Act with my employees?

 

Under the Affordable Care Act, employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act (generally, those firms that have at least one employee and at least $500,000 in annual dollar volume of business), must provide notification to their employees about the new Health Insurance Marketplace; inform employees that they may be eligible for a premium tax credit if they purchase coverage through the Marketplace; and advise employees that if they purchase a plan through the Marketplace, they may lose the employer contribution (if any) to any health benefits plan offered by the employer. Employers are required to have provided this notice to all current employees by October 1, 2013 and to each new employee at the time of hire beginning October, 1, 2013, and to each new employee at the time of hire beginning October 1, 2013, regardless of plan enrollment status (if applicable) or of part-time or full-time status. The Department of Labor has provided employers with two sample notices they may use to comply with this rule. You can find the templates in the Resources section of our page.